Murder at the Luther (Review by Minette Lauren)

Murder at the Luther by [Kaska, Kathleen]

Murder at the Luther, by Kathleen Kaska, is a very witty who done it. With tones of, I love Lucy, humor and Alfred Hitchcock eeriness, the story takes the reader on a rather captivating ride. Journalist, Sydney Lockhart, and her ragtag cast of supporting characters are more likely to dig the hole deeper than clear her name of murder. When a handsome stranger asks her to go birding and then ends up dead in her arms, Sydney is speechless. With her prints on the murder weapon and no one in Palacios, Texas to vouch for her innocence, her goose is all but cooked.
The cover of the book promises the reader a respite from modern conveniences and a stroll through past fashion magazines. Cousin Ruth’s shoe fetish and Mrs. Foghorn’s affinity for pants do not disappoint.
The 1952 New Year’s eve dance at the Luthor may be Sydney’s worst night ever, and she could sure use a hero. Her former interest in Detective Dixon may be her life raft in the turbulent storm that sweeps her away on murder charges, but the stubborn journalist exercises her feminist efforts to take care of herself. Secret messages, nosey hotel staff, an Ex-Lieutenant Governor and his illustrious wife, a Sherriff with a re-election agenda, a meddling cousin, a Cajun hit-man and more plague Sydney as she tries to find the real killer in this small coastal town.
Murder at the Luther is part of a series but reads wonderfully as a standalone. The expert author gives references to the previous experiences of the characters without dwelling on backstory.
Never a dull moment, with rollicking events that turn each page, Murder at the Luther spins an intriguing murder mystery that will keep you guessing until the end.
spacer